Age is a terrible drug, children. Rob woke up this morning creaking and cranking with pain all over his body, just from being alive at PAX for two days in a row. He’s been overseeing Nerdhole operations from our Capitol Hill HQ while Paul and Mary have been exploiting their youthful vigor and taking in the sights and sounds of Day Three.

  • Karma was the trippiest thing we’ve seen so far, and it’s sure to give a few of you some hearts and grins just to look at for a while. It’s a point-and-click game, generally not our favorite, but its gentle non-verbal directions and lack of time pressure make it a lovely, low-key experience. It’s won many nods for its art, style, and design and it’s launching this month on Steam. Check out the demo if you like what you see.
  • You can demo 2K’s Carnival Games VR in the atrium near the PAX swag booth. Available 10/28 for PlayStation VR and HTC Vive and eventually for the Oculus, the game itself is pretty straightforward–it’s exactly what it sounds like–but what’s more remarkable is just how pervasive and common VR is now. Last year PAX had a few VR games but this year a good percentage of the Indie Megabooth, as well as many of the AAA booths, were dedicated to VR games. We live in exciting times.
  • At the Indie Megabooth, Mary tried out the charming and extremely pretty Luna. A VR game for the Oculus Rift, Luna is serene, like trimming a bonsai. The textures have a vaguely mid-century feel and a bystander compared the artwork to the illustrations in Dixit. The demo starts with the player connecting stars into constellations which creates various natural items that become usable assets in the next phase. Once the player completes all the constellations, they are presented with a little terrarium-like landscape which they can populate with the items they created. (Check out our Instagram video below for a taste.) You can read more about the full game and story on their website. The game is expected to ship early next year.

  • Mark Taylor was an IT consultant stuck on a long flight playing a game that we love, rymdkapsel, when he thought, “What if somebody made this for VR? … and then made it an RTS? … and for multiplayer?” The result is the Tron-vibey goodness of Korix, one of our favorite games from this year’s Indie Megabooth:14068504_483467131861550_8297772623144320287_oThe RTS aspect feels like a nice blend of old-school Starcraft and tower defense: you’ve got a home base, and you spawn hordes of little rymdkapsel-esque “workers” who travel back and forth collecting resources from a limited number of pools on each level. You then spend those resources to buy defenses (walls, lasers, artillery, and the like, all of which can be repaired and upgraded) and offensive troops (tanks, aircraft, etc., on up to nukes) to take the fight to the relentless stream of enemy creeps.The VR was surprisingly satisfying for this kind of tower-defense tinkering: you’re like a disembodied god floating over the battlefield, using a “gun”/laser pointer to place and modify your defenses across a large grid. The mix of defense types and the large battlefield let you experiment with all sorts of strategies (do you build a maze or a castle? do you fortify a central area or sprawl out across the battlefield?), and that will surely be especially rich in multiplayer, which can be competitive or cooperative.Korix is also a great indie Cinderella story: Mark was working full time in IT and teaching himself Unity on the side. Sony called him up, interested in what he was doing, so he went to the London office and pretty soon they were discussing what he needed to make it happen for PS VR. As Mark says, “Four months ago I was booting server farms, and now I’m at PAX!” Korix arrives on PS4 later this year, and on PC for Vive and Oculus in late 2017. The floor demo is about 10 minutes, enough to play a full two-player coop battle against the AI, and well worth your time if you’re an RTS or TD fan.
  • Virtual desktops strike us as VR frippery, but the glee of one of our nine-year-old henchmen has made us take pause. He was using a Vive to search for Ssundee videos on YouTube (and to dismiss a banner ad for getting a flu shot), which seems like kicking sand in the faces of HTC developers—but wow, did he have fun. You can also modify your virtual “office” extensively, and the developers have plans for encouraging user-generated content, which has the potential for much fun weirdness. If you’re in the VR Village in the Westin, look for these guys behind the giant World War Toons encampment. They’re in town from Palo Alto and super nice and knowledgable, and it’s a great way to get some Vive time without lengthy lines and appointments. (We’re also going to watch for a fun-sounding party game they recommended, Sweet Escape VR.)IMG_9700
  • Speaking of World War Toons, that is definitely one of the essential visuals of this year’s PAX if you haven’t seen it already: