Tag Archives: LGBT

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Highlights From Emerald City Comicon, Day 1

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First of all, I always forget how impossible it is to get online at cons, so updates are going to be limited to when I can step away from the convention center. I have also never worn such an elaborate costume to a con, and I salute everyone whose costume is even more constricting and sweaty! Well done! (Costume photos tomorrow!)

After wandering the floor a bit and getting the lay of the land, I headed to my first panel of the con, Loving What You Hate: How to Love Media That Doesn’t Always Love You Back. The panel consisted of members of the Digital Future Lab at UW Bothell discussing their passion for various fandoms at the same time they examined what is problematic in each. (Problematic in this context refers to lack of diversity, racism, homophobia, etc.) It’s something many of us deal with, whether we’re directly effected by the particular issue or not. The conversation was based on a podcast episode by the same name from the DFL. The main take-away is that while we are bound to fall in love with things that have problematic themes, it’s also important to examine those problems and talk about them. And if you’re not sure if something is racist (for example), look into the response from the community it’s affecting. No community is monolithic, but it’s important to step outside yourself when an issue doesn’t directly affect you. It was a great panel, you should give the podcast episode a listen.

"The prop dept gave me a key item from each episode. So I do have Steve's blood. And a bomb." @HayleyAtwell #ECCC  — Emerald City Comicon (@emeraldcitycon) March 27, 2015
“The prop dept gave me a key item from each episode. So I do have Steve’s blood. And a bomb.” @HayleyAtwell #ECCC
— Emerald City Comicon (@emeraldcitycon) March 27, 2015
I arrived an hour early for the Hayley Atwell panel, and boy was I glad! The main hall was packed solid for Atwell’s first appearance since Agent Carter aired. The panel immediately started well: former Mythbuster Grant Imahara was the host which is a huge improvement from hosts in years past. (According to his Twitter feed Imahara is moderating a bunch of the panels throughout the weekend.) Hayley Atwell is beyond awesome: smart, well-spoken, thoughtful, compassionate, funny… everything you hope she is! She started off with a story of her clutzy first days of stunt-fighting. They didn’t end well for many members of the cast and crew, including a stuntman she accidentally kicked in the balls SIX TIMES! During the Q&A she was asked what she’d like to see next for Peggy Carter, and replied that she’d love to explore Peggy’s background and where she gained her strength and independence, or possibly see into Peggy’s future and how she handles having a family while continuing to kick ass. She also talked about how glad she is that Peggy’s friendship with Angie isn’t competitive as opposed to how female friendships are often portrayed. And while she considers Chris Evans almost like a brother, she indulged fans with a description of kissing him… he has VERY soft lips and smells really good. When asked what she’d like to be able to tell other woman, Atwell replied, “Know your value.”

Stay tuned for more tales from the con, coming up tomorrow!

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Emerald City Comicon Event Roundup!!!

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image-eccc-eventsEven if you’re not attending Emerald City Comicon proper, there are plenty of awesome nerdy events happening in Seattle this weekend! Some of them with celebrities! Here’s a sampling of events we’re excited about… maybe we’ll see you there!

Guardians of the Sexy Nerdlesque (Sold Out)
Rat Queens Afterparty at Raygun (FREE)
Pink Party hosted by Kristian Nairn (aka Hodor from GOT) at Neighbours
Laser Guardians: Awesome Mixtape Vol. 1 at Pacific Science Center
Nerds and Music: A Night with Joel Hodgson, Pat Rothfuss, and Paul & Storm
Zero Gravity: Opening Night Party for Infinite Worlds of Science Fiction at EMP
ECCC Cinema Series at Cinerama
Insert Coin Comicon Special at the Eagle

Keep up with events relevant to your interests here in the PNW with Nerdhole’s Northwest Nerd Events calendar! (Have an event you’d like us to list? Submit it here!)

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Rat Queens Is My New Favorite Comic Series

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Rat Queens Vol. 1I’m not gonna lie: I love being a late adopter. When I started watching Supernatural in its 8th season I had hours and hours of binging ahead of me before I was forced to wait for new episodes. So while I’m thrilled that Rob turned me on to Rat Queens, I’m also a little bummed it’s a fairly new series because I WANT MORE NOW. The first issue was released in September of 2013, with issue #9 due out at the end of February of this year. THAT’S LESS THAN TEN ISSUES. Which is not enough issues.

So, why am I obsessed with Rat Queens? First, it’s a hilarious chronicle of the exploits of four drunken, rowdy, badass adventurers. Second, the artwork is gorgeous. But most importantly I immediately fell in love with all of the leading ladies: Hannah, the elven mage with fantastic hair; Dee, a human cleric who’s left her religion behind her; Violet, a dwarven warrior who’s shaved her beard; and Betty, a smidgen thief who loves drugs and candy. THEY ARE SO MUCH FUN. They’re heroes-for-hire but their wake of destruction includes plenty of bar brawls as well. I saw someone describe it as “Lord of the Rings meets Sex In The City” but since I haaaaaaate Sex In The City I reject that description. Just imagine your favorite scoundrels and rogues in a raunchy Middle Earth, and also they happen to be female. Which isn’t to minimize the importance of their gender, it’s just that they’re allowed to be human(oid) instead of being sex objects or drama-obsessed shoe trees. Anyway, I dig this series hard, I’m probably going to build a costume around it, and you all should definitely read it. Also, thank you, Rob, for giving me one more thing I have to wait around for installments of.

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LGBT Representation in Comics

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The Mary Sue is currently posting an ongoing series on the history of LGBT portrayals in comics:

Next month is June, aka LGBT Pride Month. In anticipation of this, and because it is good and necessary to discuss representation in pop culture and media, we present to you this look at how LGBT content has been portrayed in mainstream American comic books. This is by no means a complete history. We don’t have the space for that. But we hope you’ll appreciate this look at some of the major forces that have shaped stories and characters in the mainstream comic book medium.

Read part 1.
Read part 2.