Categotry Archives: Video Games

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Telltale’s Guardians of the Galaxy

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For once, I’m not super-duper late to finish a game–the final episode of Telltale’s Guardians of the Galaxy just dropped a week and a half ago, and (spoiler alert?) I saved the galaxy last night.

I’ve and spoken at some length about Telltale games in the past and my mixed feelings tend toward the positive. Since these games are primarily interactive fiction, writing is key to their success, and while Telltale can’t always hit the right beats when it comes to dialogue, their plotting is usually right on and the voice acting often makes up for deficiencies in the script. The GotG game is par for the course in this regard, though some characters’ lines (eg Drax) fare much better than others’ (eg Gamora). Like every other Telltale game, you’re much more likely to enjoy this if you’re a fan of its inspiration.

Gameplay, such as it is, hasn’t changed much. Much of the story is told in cut scenes peppered with dialogue choices, most of which run on a timer. You’ll need to remember old choices and think about what other characters want to hear–or just blurt out whatever comes to mind, which can occasionally yield some lovely moments. I once had Star-Lord say something quietly humble and the game responded with a notification that read “The Guardians are mildly surprised.” Well played, writers.

The narrative is sometimes interrupted with action sequences that are essentially very simple rhythm games. When you see “A” or a left-pointing arrow (or sometimes a combo), you respond quickly and your hero does something cool–or gets shanked if you misstep. Telltale continues to improve these systems, though they can still be frustrating to folks on either end of the hand-eye coordination spectrum who can find them trivial or punishing. One recent innovation I love is scripting fight sequences to match Star-Lord’s ever-present soundtrack. Given that these scenes play like stripped-down versions of Rock Band, it’s an inspired choice and I hope they pursue it more in the future. The climactic battle, set to Heart’s “Crazy on You,” is sublime.

Replayability is a key feature of interactive fiction, and I imagine I’l come back to GotG at some point to see what happens if I choose to [REDACTED] the [REDACTED]. It’s fun, it’s (mostly) affecting, and the soundtrack is terrific. Are you Groot?

 

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Civilization VI: I’m getting too old for this shit

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The Medicis are going to the moon!
The Medicis are going to the moon!

Things have been pretty quiet around here lately, and I’m full of excuses. My current hot #1 all-inclusive excuse for neglecting friends, family, and pressing medical concerns is last month’s launch of Civilization VI.

If you’re a regular, you know I’m a fan of the series*, and I wrote it up in our pre-Nerdhole days as well. Hell, I’ve been playing since at least 2004 when I picked up a used copy of Civ III. The series scratches quite a few itches–alternate history, resource allocation, exploration, and absurd situations like archers destroying (severely wounded) tanks. “One more turn” is to me and my fellow Civ players what “Braaaaains” is to zombies of a certain era.

And so here we are. Civ VI has been out for not quite a month and I have been playing the hell out of it despite, as usual, not quite having the hardware capacity to keep it running smoothly. Endgame turns run loooong, especially if I’ve got more than a couple of opponents left in the game. But I persevere, and I expect to upgrade my hardware soon BUT NOT JUST BECAUSE OF THIS GAME. GOD!

I’ve seen this version called an incremental advance, but some of those increments are, well, game-changing. One innovation that is a much bigger deal than I had thought is the notion of districts. Each city now has to build out districts to contain particular kinds of buildings, and you can only have so many per city. That means you need to choose just a few out of many options for each city–that holy site may keep you from building a factory when you need it later in the game, or that hot new entertainment complex may hold back your scientific achievement. In older versions, you’d just pack each city with as many buildings as you could afford to maintain. This forces strategic choice on almost every turn.

Another change is in workers (now called “builders”) and improvements. Each unit now comes loaded with a few charges it can use to build farms, drain marshes, or carve out quarries–and they can’t be automated. Many of us relied on AI to take care of building infrastructure–just like real life–and I was sure I would hate having to micromanage that aspect of the game. As usual, I was wrong. The designers have changed the game on many levels to make tile improvements both more important and less time-consuming. Roads get built automatically via trade routes, and the number of strategic resources needed has dropped significantly. Now you just pop out a builder when you need to get a new city buzzing quickly or when you learn how to handle a new resource like coal or aluminum. See above re: forcing strategic choice.

There are other big changes, though some of them hearken back to the Civilization Revolution offshoot series: Units can be combined into stronger armies, but they’re limited and don’t create the stacked-unit problem endemic to pre-Civ V versions of the game. The interface is a little cartoonier, diplomacy is deeper and weirder, and the victory conditions have changed considerably–and now include a religious victory.

Stop! It’s caveat time! Some concepts have sent me scrambling for Google when the help system failed me–but I likely just clicked past those parts of the tutorial in my eagerness to get to the real game. Your first few games will be much more satisfying if you keep your phone handy to learn why the world looks so different to settlers and how spreading religion works in detail–and so much more. Maybe in-game help systems are vestigial now? It’s a small gripe–go forth and civilize!

Hey, our pals over at A Podcast for All Intents and Purposes** chatted about Civ VI not too long ago–check it out.


* Beyond Earth did not hold up well, in my opinion. An interesting exercise for sure, but gimme my Gandhi back.

** Note to editorial staff: Please set up a hotkey to autocomplete this.

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Pax Day 4: No, YOU Calm Down

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And so we say goodbye to another PAX. We can’t wait to see how much more VR will be at the next one, and how that will drive non-VR content. For now, we’re going to rest our strained muscles and settle into waiting for all the fun stuff  to come out IRL. Here’s what we saw today:

  • We wanted to like Don’t Starve more than we actually did, but Klei’s new game looks like it’ll keep us happy. It’s called Oxygen Not Included, and it’s a space colony sim that feels like Fallout Shelter with legs. There’s a lot more to do, the art looks just as sweet as Don’t Starve, and the interface seems to have learned a lot from other sims.
  • We liked watching Objects in Space, a “modempunk” stealth space trading game, but were too intimidated to give it a shot ourselves. It’s built by an Australian brother and sister team (he designs, she codes), and it came to PAX with an insane Arduino controller set that looked delightfully scrungy. The garage/DIY aesthetic is lovely,and the gameplay revolves around stealth combat avoidance, with occasional battles using remote sensors. Madness, but seemingly good madness.
  • OMG YOU GUYS. [Mary here.] OMG FALLOUT VR. I honestly don’t think I’ve ever played a demo that I loved as much as this. Paul and I waited two hours in line for an eight minute demo and it was worth EVERY SECOND. We’re easy marks since we’re such huge Fallout fans, but I’ll be as objective as I can be. At E3, Bethesda announced that Fallout 4 will be available in 2017 on the HTC Vive, which is the device we used. The demo takes place at the Red Rocket truck stop. When you phase in, your good buddy Dogmeat is there and I can’t tell you how great it was to see him there. You have a Pip-Boy on your left wrist and a pistol in your right hand. You are able to cycle through the Pip-Boy modes with the Vive controller. It’s relatively intuitive, and I imagine with more time it becomes second-nature. You can then pick up a laser rifle, a shotgun, and a Fat Man from a table and cycle through them with your right controller. That’s when the action begins. The first wave is a few raiders, pretty easy to take down. Sadly they shot the Fat Man off the table before I had a chance to grab it (I might have been distracted by the fact I was IN the Commonwealth) and it glitched and disappeared so I stuck with my pistol and shotgun. (Paul used the Fat Man on everything and made short work of it all.) The next wave is feral ghouls… I screamed SO LOUD. It’s one thing when they’re hurling themselves toward you in 2D, but in a virtual environment it’s absolutely frightening. I got a little disoriented making sure I’d taken them all down and the next thing I knew, a Deathclaw had come up behind me… If the feral ghouls were frightening, the Deathclaw was pants-shittingly terrifying. I finally killed him and spent a few minutes exploring, which was just wonderful… Being fully transported into a world I love so much was entirely satisfying. Pretty much anything you can interact with in the game is also available to interact with in the VR version, including the crafting table, though the demo didn’t have crafting as an option. VATS wasn’t available in the demo either, but presumably it will be in a full version of the game. The only downside for me was not enough time to learn the interface, a problem that will certainly be solved with time on my side. Others have noted that this is more a proof-of-concept tech demo than a game, but if you’re familiar with Fallout it’s impossible not to see the potential. Also, you guys, feral ghouls and Deathclaws in your face! [/Mary]

    Paul checking out the wasteland of the Commonwealth. That's just wall art in the background, they asked that we not share images of the content.
    Paul checking out the wasteland of the Commonwealth. That’s just wall art in the background, they asked that we not share images of the content.
  • The extremely charming roguelike Rogue Wizards drew us in with its vivid graphics and fun interface, but we swooned when we read this on their site: “A narrative with a core message of gender and class equality.” Awwwww! It’s out shortly on Steam.
  • If you, like us, missed out on the PAX screening of the live-action Lookouts short film due to the injustice of our universe’s temporal laws, you’ll be glad to find out you can watch it online. Please, though, try to watch in on a big screen if at all possible. (Speaking of the Lookouts, read about Thornwatch in Saturday’s post and get in on the Thornwatch Kickstarter while the getting is good. It has now tripled its goal, if you’re keeping track!)
  • Let Them Come is a soon-to-be-out mobile and PC game that essentially lets you relive the sentry gun scene from Aliens—but with you on the trigger, prosecuting an endless stream of alien extermination in the strobing light and staccato sound of your trusty mounted space gun. This was one of those games that sucked us in at first with a fun idea and art, and then we were kind of surprised (given the game’s limited scope) to still be playing it 20 minutes later. That addictiveness bodes well for mobile! You fight enemies in waves, with new and more tactically interesting aliens (and bosses) getting thrown into the mix.When you inevitably succumb to the onslaught and get overrun, you get a chance to buy active and passive upgrades to improve your odds next time around. A fun touch: you get to the upgrade screen by clicking on your “BoomBox,” which is sitting behind you blasting out tunes appropriate to the task at hand. You also collect “mixtapes” and choose your soundtrack. Fun! A bonus: Let Them Come is published by Versus Evil, which also publishes two other games we love, Guild of Dungeoneering and Banner Saga 2.
    Splat_2
  • Elder Scrolls: Legends entered beta at the beginning of August and there was a pretty huge booth dedicated to it at PAX. Joining the ranks of Hearthstone and Magic Duels, Legends is an online deck-building game featuring familiar characters from the Elder Scrolls universe. [Editor’s note: Yeah that’s great… Did I mention how awesome Fallout VR is?! I mean, I love Elder Scrolls, but can I fight an enormous virtual dragon?! You guys. Seriously. Fallout VR.] When Legends launches, it will be available on iOS and Windows.

    Elder Scrolls: Legends booth at PAX
    Elder Scrolls: Legends booth at PAX… there was about a 90 minute line to play.
  • How can there still be undiscovered arcade ideas that are this elegant and fun? Inversus is in this year’s PAX 10 and it’s like frantic high-speed murder Othello. The trailer below can modem a description of it into your brain faster than we can describe it:
  • We can’t wait to explore Moon Hunters more. We first saw this helping judge the PAX 10 and it accomplished the unlikely feat of mixing a meditative mood involving world-building with sprinting Robotron-style arcade combat. Read some of the impassioned reviews on Steam if you need convincing, it’s designed for 1–2 hour playthroughs with 1–4 players coop, where you relive the same fateful few days building your individual reputation and legacy. (How can you not love this from the developers: “Moon Hunters could be described as a mythology generator.”)

Check out our long-ago PAX coverage right here.

[Editor’s note: Did I mention how much I love Fallout VR?]

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PAX West Day Three: Skip Your Next Turn

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Age is a terrible drug, children. Rob woke up this morning creaking and cranking with pain all over his body, just from being alive at PAX for two days in a row. He’s been overseeing Nerdhole operations from our Capitol Hill HQ while Paul and Mary have been exploiting their youthful vigor and taking in the sights and sounds of Day Three.

  • Karma was the trippiest thing we’ve seen so far, and it’s sure to give a few of you some hearts and grins just to look at for a while. It’s a point-and-click game, generally not our favorite, but its gentle non-verbal directions and lack of time pressure make it a lovely, low-key experience. It’s won many nods for its art, style, and design and it’s launching this month on Steam. Check out the demo if you like what you see.
  • You can demo 2K’s Carnival Games VR in the atrium near the PAX swag booth. Available 10/28 for PlayStation VR and HTC Vive and eventually for the Oculus, the game itself is pretty straightforward–it’s exactly what it sounds like–but what’s more remarkable is just how pervasive and common VR is now. Last year PAX had a few VR games but this year a good percentage of the Indie Megabooth, as well as many of the AAA booths, were dedicated to VR games. We live in exciting times.
  • At the Indie Megabooth, Mary tried out the charming and extremely pretty Luna. A VR game for the Oculus Rift, Luna is serene, like trimming a bonsai. The textures have a vaguely mid-century feel and a bystander compared the artwork to the illustrations in Dixit. The demo starts with the player connecting stars into constellations which creates various natural items that become usable assets in the next phase. Once the player completes all the constellations, they are presented with a little terrarium-like landscape which they can populate with the items they created. (Check out our Instagram video below for a taste.) You can read more about the full game and story on their website. The game is expected to ship early next year.

  • Mark Taylor was an IT consultant stuck on a long flight playing a game that we love, rymdkapsel, when he thought, “What if somebody made this for VR? … and then made it an RTS? … and for multiplayer?” The result is the Tron-vibey goodness of Korix, one of our favorite games from this year’s Indie Megabooth:14068504_483467131861550_8297772623144320287_oThe RTS aspect feels like a nice blend of old-school Starcraft and tower defense: you’ve got a home base, and you spawn hordes of little rymdkapsel-esque “workers” who travel back and forth collecting resources from a limited number of pools on each level. You then spend those resources to buy defenses (walls, lasers, artillery, and the like, all of which can be repaired and upgraded) and offensive troops (tanks, aircraft, etc., on up to nukes) to take the fight to the relentless stream of enemy creeps.The VR was surprisingly satisfying for this kind of tower-defense tinkering: you’re like a disembodied god floating over the battlefield, using a “gun”/laser pointer to place and modify your defenses across a large grid. The mix of defense types and the large battlefield let you experiment with all sorts of strategies (do you build a maze or a castle? do you fortify a central area or sprawl out across the battlefield?), and that will surely be especially rich in multiplayer, which can be competitive or cooperative.Korix is also a great indie Cinderella story: Mark was working full time in IT and teaching himself Unity on the side. Sony called him up, interested in what he was doing, so he went to the London office and pretty soon they were discussing what he needed to make it happen for PS VR. As Mark says, “Four months ago I was booting server farms, and now I’m at PAX!” Korix arrives on PS4 later this year, and on PC for Vive and Oculus in late 2017. The floor demo is about 10 minutes, enough to play a full two-player coop battle against the AI, and well worth your time if you’re an RTS or TD fan.
  • Virtual desktops strike us as VR frippery, but the glee of one of our nine-year-old henchmen has made us take pause. He was using a Vive to search for Ssundee videos on YouTube (and to dismiss a banner ad for getting a flu shot), which seems like kicking sand in the faces of HTC developers—but wow, did he have fun. You can also modify your virtual “office” extensively, and the developers have plans for encouraging user-generated content, which has the potential for much fun weirdness. If you’re in the VR Village in the Westin, look for these guys behind the giant World War Toons encampment. They’re in town from Palo Alto and super nice and knowledgable, and it’s a great way to get some Vive time without lengthy lines and appointments. (We’re also going to watch for a fun-sounding party game they recommended, Sweet Escape VR.)IMG_9700
  • Speaking of World War Toons, that is definitely one of the essential visuals of this year’s PAX if you haven’t seen it already:

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PAX West, Day Two: Heroes and Villains and Bunnies, Oh My!

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We’re wisely pacing ourselves this year and focusing on a few things instead of trying to do ALL THE THINGS. We hope to continue this trend through the evening and be in good shape again tomorrow (#HangoversofPAXPast.) At any rate here’s what caught our attention today.

  • We sat in on an Acquisitions Incorporated Intern Program orientation session, and were mighty impressed with the efficiency and deadly humor on display. Two AcqInc Career Counselors laid down the law, instructing new D&D players on the basics of gameplay with delightful snark and an amazing video straight from the Ninth Circle of Human Resources. With slogans like “Do Don’t Die” and “Sometimes teamwork means not being on the same team” (that last one ad-libbed by a deft Career Counselor), the interns were well prepped to head out and collect treasure.
  • Mary attended the World of Warcraft: Legion panel, which she’ll write about at greater length later. The mood was jovial, and both the fans and devs had a great time discussing the new content. The biggest news was the announcement of the Legion Companion App, available for iOS and Android. Launching this coming Tuesday, September 6, the app will allow players to complete certain tasks and quests from their phone when they can’t be in Azeroth. This has been a much-requested feature and the room erupted in whoops and applause followed by a lone shout of “THANK YOU!!!!” Check out the trailer below:
  • We passed a group of women in costume, each one a mash-up of a Playboy bunny and a superhero. Mary had some complicated feelings about the costumes: “I had heard that’s a thing and thought it couldn’t possibly be a thing. It’s not that I’m against sexy cosplay at all (my love of nerd burlesque is well-documented) and I absolutely believe everyone should wear whatever makes them happy. But I find it problematic to use such a blatant symbol of the male gaze since it seems to play right into the idea that girls aren’t fans, they’re just dressing up for male attention. It would be great if they were commenting on that terrible trope, but that didn’t seem to be the case.” Feel free to mansplain to Mary in the comments why she’s wrong. (Rob and Paul are pretty sure she’s right.)
  • We demoed a prototype of the Penny Arcade–Lone Shark Games collaboration Thornwatch today—with Paul running the demo!—and had a great time. The last time that we playtested this game was literally in a garage three years ago, and while it was already fun then, it’s really matured into a solid little gem. It’s part board game, part card game, part graphic novel. Play is quick and the learning curve is gentle as you master the deck of one of five members of the Thornwatch, but even crunchier gamers will appreciate the elegant ideas in play here—especially a “momentum” system that melds damage and initiative into a satisfying and constantly shifting back-and-forth. (Fellow fans of PA will of course swoon over the source material.) We exhort you to try the game either at Lone Shark’s sixth-floor booth or (even better) in the Thornwatch freeplay area on the third floor of Olive 8. The Kickstarter has already more than doubled its goal.IMG_9675
  • We made some Xbox One custom controllers the hard way back in the day with non-OEM parts, YouTube videos, and some sharp little arcane plastic tools. This is oh so much cooler.  And yee, look at the Swatch one! Plus, with your gamertag. So ordering.IMG_9653IMG_9657
  • Indie games can take a long and winding road to release, and it’s heartening to see Night in the Woods so close to coming out (“this fall!”) on the PS4 (and PC/Mac/Linux) after its successful Kickstarter way back in 2013. Described at one point as “like Gone Home, in third-person, with talking animals,” Night in the Woods has a kids-book style but with a smart, intricate melancholy to it. You play as a wayward college dropout Mae (yes, a cat), back in her hometown and slowly discovering that something weird is up. Most of the exploration comes through dialogue, and the town is full of well-realized characters (apparently over 60 of them), and your choices affect the path that you take through an 8 to 10 hour story. What a nice weird break amidst the giant Sony presence.
  • We took a look at a few of the PAX 10, and were as impressed as usual. Blockships was a sweet little shmup that is strongly reminiscent of Galaxy Trucker. You start as the core of a starship and then race to collect new components to add to your ship while other folks are doing the same and trying to kill you. They keep it simple with just gun, engine, and power components, but there’s an interesting richness to it because each hit knocks off components that anyone can grab. It’s 10% off on Steam now through 9/9.
  • Splitter Critters, also in the PAX 10, looked a little intimidating until we learned that we were watching a very advanced level. It’s a lovely puzzle game with a unique mechanic—players swipe to split the level and then can shift the pieces to create new configurations. It’s easier to show than describe, so check out the trailer below. We’re psyched that this has been Greenlit on Steam.

(This post has been edited.)

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PAX West 2016 Day One: We have to call it “PAX West” now.

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We’re back at PAX, which has finally succumbed to the reality of large, successful organizations and renamed itself “PAX West.” We’re super-psyched for the success of our favorite nerd show, but it was nice to experience Northwest privilege while it lasted. PAX Prime is dead, long live PAX West!

Other than that, the vibe and essence of the con haven’t changed, as far as we can tell. Everyone is still super-friendly, the scene feels super-inclusive, and the focus on fans and players is clear as day. They’ve put together something special for sure, and we’re grateful for all they do.

  • We swept through the Indie Megabooth, scouting it out for more focused time during the rest of the show. One very noticeable difference was the massive number of VR games available. This was also true of the main show floor, but it was fascinating to see that tech get adopted so quickly by small, scrappy devs. Rob tends to experience IRL nausea when he’s set up with VR, but Paul and Mary welcome the new hotness.
  • We may have more to say about this later, but we wanted to give a quick shout out to Open Sorcery, which is on display at the Indie Megabooth. It’s a text adventure that incorporates modern elements to damp down frustration (it’s based on Twine, which is a big help) (can we just take a moment to reflect on how great Twine is? Like really?). You are a magical being that is also a firewall protecting community sites from intrusion, which should send some of you straight into the Smile Zone. Maybe its premise is a little hard to explain, but it’s well worth a look—check it out free online. It’s also on iOS and Android if that works better for you.
  • Mary wandered into the Bethesda booth and was immediately mesmerized by the trailers, standing open-mouthed and staring for a very long time. You won’t be surprised to hear that we’re all really looking forward to the latest Fallout 4 DLC, Nuka World. We saw both the adorable animated trailer and the gameplay trailer, the highlight of the latter being feral ghouls getting run over with a roller coaster. We really want to do that.

  • When we walked up to Republic of Gamers’ booth and there were only three or four people waiting to play Minecraft on the Oculus, we were like, “Did this come out last year?” But no! It was just the magic of Friday. (And perhaps the distraction of the ridiculously huge ARK T-Rex across the way.) Minecraft VR is pretty much brand new—less so for Gear VR—and it is hell of fun. Our nine-year-old nerdling henchmen very excitedly said, one to the other, exactly what you might expect: “It’s like you’re in Minecraft, dude!” We talked to the nice RoG guy about the future of more and more games being VR ready, and the coding hurdles required in basically creating simultaneous tandem left-eye and right-eye renderings. He was partial to playing Project CARS on Oculus (games where your avatar is stationary, e.g. in a driver’s seat, are of course ideal for VR), and he said that Project CARS 2 will likely be built even more for that experience.

    Oculus Steve! #minecraftvr #paxwest2016 #meatspace #republicofgamers

    A video posted by Nerdhole Podcast (@nerdholistic) on

  • We have little experience with Dishonored, but the trailer for the sequel looks fantastic. In a very general way you could say that it’s steampunk-meets-Assassin’s Creed, but that’s not really doing it justice. Both the cinematic and the gameplay trailers show a neat mechanic that involves the player character turning into a smoky, ethereal form to sneak up on enemies and squeeze through tight spots. There’s architecture that literally folds up and transforms as you pass through it and an eerie conspiracy driving the plot. We’ll post more if we’re able to try out the demo.

  • Rob was intrigued and a little nostalgic about the trailer for the rebooted Prey, coming next year from Bethesda. It’s one of the first games he picked up for his Xbox 360, and it had some fascinating physical mechanics—like portals, a year before Valve’s Portal made us fall in love with magical door-like contraptions. It also gave a taste of social justice issues, as it starred Native American characters and used some kind of problematic Native American spirituality in what was basically a bug hunt. It turns out that the developers did a fairly decent job of reaching out to Native communities, and the protagonist is nothing like any stereotype we’ve ever seen. The new game is a “reimagining,” which could mean practically anything, but Rob will keep his eyes on it.
  • We were surprised to see that Blizzard had an entire booth dedicated to their brand-new World of Warcraft expansion, Legion. Blizzard makes relatively few appearances at PAX West, and generally it’s been well before an expansion drops. On the other hand, they’ve been working hard to make WoW even more accessible to new and returning players, and this is most likely part of that push. Mary will certainly have an entire post dedicated to Legion at some point since there’s plenty to say about it, but here’s the tl;dr: it has launched much more smoothly and with more fanfare than the last few expansions, so if you’re thinking about trying the WoW, now is a good time to do it.
  • We took a quick look at Yukon Salon, which was being touted in the board game zone by our podcast pal Andrew of A Podcast For All Intents and Purposes. It’s a fun-looking card game that involves (among other things) giving afros to miners and bears. More like BEARSTYLES, right? Anyway, there’ll be a Kickstarter coming your way in the very near future, and we’ll let you know when that goes live.
  • Our nine-year-old nerdling henchmen took us on a tour of Kaladesh, i.e., into the depths of a completely Magic’kd-up Paramount Theater to celebrate the debut of the new expansion. These were the highlights:
    IMG_9559For Seattle gamers who have probably seen everything from the Pixies to Soundgarden to Yo Gabba Gabba Live! here (we’re not judging), it’s exciting to see the Paramount all dolled up for one of our favorite games.
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    These guys were playing in the “Inventors’ League,” a free casual competition in which you grab a small deck (you pick your favorite color, plus a random one), put on a lanyard to identify your inventiveness to other Inventors, and then play five matches for a $2 discount on tourney play. There are many OP events (including 2HG, Mini-Master, and Deck-builder’s Toolkit Challenge) all weekend.
    IMG_9578
    Or you can simply bask in the Magic World Championship happening on center stage, with the top 24 players in the world playing quietly in the background and duking it out for $70K. The stage is also home to many great Magic panels and an M:tG improv show on Saturday night that we kind of can’t not go to. (Is “Yes, and…” an instant? I need the name of a planeswalker and an enchantment! We’re here all weekend, folks.)
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    You can also just stand in the lobby and fog up the glass looking at REAL LIVE KALADESH BOOSTERS!
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    Last but not least, follow Magic on Twitter to learn about how they’re giving away these over-sized cards from the new set several times a day. This one went to the first person to bring a “vehicle” (in this case, a Magic Carpet card) to the corner of 9th and Pine at the appointed time. BTW, even if you don’t have a PAX pass, the whole alley beside the Paramount will be bustling with Kaladesh madness that you can partake in starting at 10am every morning, including Kaladesh cosplayers, glass-blowing, and a build-your-own-ornithopter(!) area.

Check out previous years’ PAX coverage at the Stranger right here. We’re also posting tons of stuff on Instagram!

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My Favorite Part of the World of Warcraft: Legion Pre-Patch

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InterfaceThe World of Warcraft: Legion pre-patch came out just over a week ago and the thing I’ve spent the most time doing is playing with the new transmogrification interface. For the uninitiated, WoW allows you to re-skin your armor with the appearance of other items you’ve obtained.

I’m not the only one obsessively playing dress-up… the first few days after the patch the transmog NPCs in every city were mobbed with players. It looked like a Black Friday sale at Wal-Mart. I’ve already built nine outfits for Lucythia, my main character, and at least two for most other characters I have. Which is a lot.

Previous to this patch any item that you might want to use for transmogrification had to be stored in your inventory (in your bags, bank, or Void Storage), which meant that those of us who love to transmog could quickly run out of space. With the new interface every item you’ve ever received as a quest reward or as a drop is now available account-wide in a nice searchable interface, so you can sell all the armor that’s been cluttering up your storage. The interface shows you how your character will look in each item, and you can choose to hide your helmet, shoulders, and/or cloak. It also allows you to save outfits—and name them—so you can easily switch between appearances (for a modest sum of gold, of course).

Below is a gallery of a few of the looks I’ve put together… since each wardrobe change costs a little over 300 gold for me, I’ve just included the dressing room images here, except for the outfit each character is currently wearing. Enjoy!

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The Fabulously Creepy Game We Happy Few Is Currently In Early Access

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WeHappyFew_14 I meant to do a post about this game during E3 because it is seriously up my alley. Developed by Compulsion (who also brought us Contrast), We Happy Few is a first-person survival stealth adventure game, and it’s currently available for play on Xbox One Game Preview, Steam Early Access, and GOG.com Games in Development. I’ve seen it compared to Bioshock, and once you watch the trailer and gameplay below you’ll see why. The retro, dystopian landscape populated with violent masked denizens feels very much like Rapture. I’ll definitely be checking it out.

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Episode 66 – Sorcerer of the Wildeeps, Inside, and Thunder Alley

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Plenty of nerd for everyone!
Plenty of nerd for everyone!

Hey, it’s a Nerdhole sampler! We talk about a cool, short book by Kai Ashante Wilson, the sweet new video game by the folks behind Limbo, and a board game that briefly made NASCAR seem interesting. And we managed to bust out an entire podcast without talking about television. Achievement unlocked!

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Episode 65 – Warcraft: The Beginning

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No orcs allowed in the Uncanny Valley
No orcs allowed in the Uncanny Valley

Should you see that World of Warcraft movie? Listen and find out. Since Paul and Rob are so woefully ignorant when it comes to all things WoW, we invited two smarties from Mary’s guild, Kraken Skulls, to help enlighten us. Big thanks to Jeremy and Mike for taking the time to join us!

ERRATA
Even the Lore Dorks miss now and then. When we were talking about one of the towns that was destroyed in the film, we said “Redridge” when we meant “Lakeshire.” The town of Lakeshire is located in the province of Redridge. We sincerely regret the error.

UPDATE: Apparently Warcraft did NOT make enough money in China to guarantee a sequel, so the future of the franchise is uncertain.

RELATED UPDATE: Mike sent this Wired article about why Warcraft did so well in China.
Tl;dr: China’s State content regulatory entity only allows 35 foreign films to open in the country each year, and the Chinese conglomerate Dalian Wanda owns Legendary Entertainment, which made the movie. It goes even further to look at how Legendary funded the making of the movie by selling equity to Chinese entities, including the China Film Group, which is apparently a part of the Chinese government.

ALSO: Blizzard is finally doing something about the toxic community in WoW, they’re instituting a silencing system for repeat offenders.

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